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By George Sirius, CEO, Eventsforce

Today I read an article focussed on a recent study by the consumer group ‘Which?’. The study revealed that more consumers think the UK economy will improve next year than those who think it will get worse. In total, 36% of people questioned believe the economy will improve in the next 12 months compared to the 29% who think it will worsen. The proportion of people rating the economy as good was, at 13%, the highest since July last year. Of course, the study also revealed plenty of other figures that suggest that consumers still have many reservations and fears about the future of the UK economy, but I think it is no coincidence that when bad news is often perceived as being far more newsworthy, the article chose to lead with a strongly positive headline and focus.

This positive and optimistic attitude is something that I encounter on a day to day basis. UK business has always been dynamic and progressive with a real focus on doing well and meeting goals. Yes, the last few years have been difficult for many companies, but increasingly I’m seeing an increase in positivity amongst the business leaders I talk to. There is a real sense of wanting to do business, wanting to start new projects, break new markets and embrace new technologies, and this can only be a good thing. On a personal level,  I share these feelings, and am quietly confident that the rest of the financial year will be as rewarding as the first 5 months.

So what does this mean for the events industry and event professionals? Well, firstly, an increase in the desire to create new business is good news, and events are a key tool in getting this done. In times of recession, some companies may reduce the number and size of events they organise. It’s often not the correct thing to do but it happens. Optimism reverses this trend and it is the challenge for event management professionals to facilitate these events, promote their industry as a solution for new business creation and embrace the future with the same positivity as the hopefully prophetic UK consumer.

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